RF Coil Designs for Ultra-High Field Magnetic Resonance in Humans & Method Development in Translational Neuroscience

Tarih: 08.01.2018
Yer: Biyomedikal Mühendisliği Enstitüsü, AZ-19,   Boğaziçi Üniversitesi Kandilli Kampüsü, İstanbul

RF Coil Designs for Ultra-High Field Magnetic Resonance in Humans

Dr. Özlem İpek

RF lab at Centre d’Imagerie BioMédicale (CIBM) at EPFL,
Lausanne, Switzerland

 

9 January 2018 (Tuesday);   11.00 – 12.00 

Biomedical Engineering Institute, AZ-19,  
Boğaziçi University Kandilli Campus

 

About The Seminar:

To  acquire  high-resolution  and  –sensitivity  images  at  ultra-high field  magnetic resonance (MR) scanner,  various  hardware  solutions  can  be  utilized:  dedicated  RF  coil  design  for  a  certain anatomical  region  of  the  human  brain,  merging  high  dielectric  constant  materials  with  the  existing  RF  coil  concepts,  use  of  multi-channel  transmit  RF  coil  arrays  on  a parallel  transmit  system  to  steer  any  signal  amplitude  or  phase.  Besides  these  solutions,  MR safety  limitations  have  been  wisely  investigated,  i.e.  simultaneous EEG-fMRI  setup  at  7  T  MR  is  simulated  with  finite  difference  time  domain  method  to  assess  its  RF  safety.  My talk will address various RF hardware solutions for 7 Tesla human brain and extremities proton and multi nuclei MR imaging and spectroscopy.

About the Speaker

Özlem Ipek is a scientist and managing director of the RF lab at Centre d’Imagerie BioMédicale (CIBM) at EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland. She completed her undergraduate education in Physics (2005) at the Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey, and obtained her master′s degree (2008) in Applied Physics at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e), Eindhoven, Netherlands. Between 2008 and 2012, she worked on her PhD project at the Department of Radiotherapy and Radiology at the University Medical Hospital Utrecht, and she received her PhD from Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands. Her research focusses on technological development for clinical needs and advancements of human magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at ultra-high field (7T). Specifically, she works on novel MR hardware designs and methods to assess the safety of radiofrequency antennas and MR compatible devices within MR environment as well as to facilitate high-resolution human head imaging and spectroscopy as a way to investigate brain metabolism.   

 

 

 

Method Development in Translational Neuroscience


Daniela Schulz, Ph.D.

Department of Psychology, Yeditepe University

 

9 January 2018 (Tuesday);   13.00 – 14.00 

Biomedical Engineering Institute, AZ-19,  
Boğaziçi University Kandilli Campus

 

About The Seminar:

In my talk, I will first introduce two animal models of depression that I have co-developed and studied, respectively, termed ‘extinction-induced despair’ and ‘congenital helplessness’.  Next, I will introduce my second line of work on ‘behavioral neuroimaging’, a method I coined to refer to the simultaneous assessment of rodent behavior and neurochemistry using RatCAP tomography.  The RatCAP is a miniature PET scanner that rats wear on the head and allows the rat, with the help of a pendular support system, to move around and be active during the PET scan.  I will demonstrate the tools and methods we developed to achieve the goal of behavioral neuroimaging.  I will present my work with reversible tracers, 11C-raclopride and 11C-(+)-PHNO, and a dynamic-like multi-injection protocol I developed for use with 18F-FDG.

About the Speaker

Daniela Schulz (DS) is a behavioral neuroscientist with a track record that dates back to 1999.  She has work experiences in psychology, neurobiology, and medicine, and has collaborated with researchers from various fields, including biomedical engineering.  Her research focuses on method development in translational neuroscience.  Among the methods she developed is a PET imaging method she coined ‘behavioral neuroimaging’, which has garnered international attention. DS obtained her B.A. and M.A. degrees in Psychology from Boğaziçi University, where she began her research career in the area of depression.  She received her Ph.D. in Behavioral Neuroscience from the University of Düsseldorf in Germany, where she co-developed her animal model of depression, termed ‘extinction-induced despair’.  She stayed on as a post-doc for 1.5 years before she became a research associate in the Medical Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York.  There, she established her second line of research on ‘behavioral neuroimaging’.  When she was awarded an NIH grant to further develop the method, she moved on to Stony Brook University, New York, as Senior Research Scientist and Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurobiology.  Following a short stint as Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Diagnostic Radiology at Yale University, she returned to Turkey to accept a faculty position in the Department of Psychology at Yeditepe University.